Isolation Journal

We have been on level 3 of the Coronavirus lockdown for a few weeks now. In NSW, Australia this means only going out to exercise, to shop for food and working from home, if you still have a job. Like everyone else I often get the feeling that each day is merging into the next. I walk my dog every morning, this exercise walk usually takes 2 hours and we get going at around 6:30 am.

This early start means its just coming on light when we set off and there is next to no traffic. Lots of off leash time for Queenie my 8 month old Groodle and a meditative, quiet time for me. Giving me some grounding and a sense of accomplishment ahead of my day. I usually walk with my iPhone, but have taken to including my SLR two lenses and a pair of binoculars.

The challenge is to not think too far into the future at the moment. I would love to hear how everyone else is coping.

Trig Bagging – Mt Arawang

IMG_0079Tuesday 7.30 am and the temperature was 10 decrees celsius, with a cool north-westerly wind blowing. A perfect morning for a walk/run on the ridge, work can wait for an hour or so. Mt Arawang at 765 metres is at the southern end of the Coolamon Ridge walk. The access track from the Kambah horse paddocks is steep and a great cardio workout.

Trigs have a cosmic intrigue for me, the symmetry of the structure exposed to the elements. A great space for some meditation and quiet reflection.

 

 

Snakey question

I know there are brown snakes around the property where we live. We installed a perimeter of snakes deterrents before the start of summer. They are beeping and pulsing away all round the house and we haven’t seen a snake for months.  Now I am not sure how to tackle this one.

When I was spreading a pile of wood chips this morning, I uncovered a what looks like a nest inside the pile. I think that it is a brown snake’s nest. Now not sure what my next step should be. Is mumma snake inside or just the eggs?

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More tales from the backpacking granny

My bus trip from Udaipur to Mumbai. The first time I visited Udaipur in India. I admit that I was a complete travel wimp! Travel wimps are sad souls who want to see the world. Alas, they miss out on so much because they are too frightened to go where others dare to tread. They…

via A Hectic bus ride from Udaipur to Mumbai — Backpackergranny

Brian Manning’s Tucker Box 

This battered, metal tuckerbox was used on outback trips to support strikers during the historic nine-year Wave Hill walk-off 1966 to 1975. I was intrigued by the contents, especially the inclusion of a smart red pepper grinder and some Tupperware containers. So I went along to the Australian National Museum in Canberra today to have a look for myself.

I like most Australians learnt almost nothing about Aboriginal history at school, I had assumed that the Wave Hill Walk off took place pre WWII. Hence my curiosity about the modern day implements. The tuckerbox was built to be animal-proof and to withstand tough conditions. Manning arranged the transport of supplies from the union to support the strike, initially at Victoria River, using his TJ Series Bedford truck. This has also been acquired by ANM and is being stablised for travel and is expected to arrive in Canberra later this year.


Photos courtesy of the Australian National Museum Canberra

Stranger Pond

imageOne of the benefits of working from home and being home alone is that my daily schedule is completely mine to arrange, for today anyway. I decided to take a look at an ebird hotspot just 8 minutes drive away. Work could always start when I got back.

I was amazed that I had never been here before having lived in this area for 12 years. I set off with the idea of making a circumnavigation of the pond. Then I saw this inviting track leading off to the west, that led me down to the Murrimbidgee River and the Bicentennial National Trail.

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I enjoy walking on a cool Autumn morning as you don’t need to be on the lookout for snakes, you can completely relax and take in all the small noises and smells of the bush.. mindful walking at it’s best. The circumnavigation and  detour took around 95 minutes and my bird list included  20 species, not a bad result given the foggy conditions.

Christmas holidays day 1

After a mind numbingly busy year that finished with managing 7 seven major events in four weeks, my long awaited holiday has finally began with a stay at my brother in laws’ shack near Narooma. I woke before dawn eager to get the day started. Sleeping in, sitting still and being idle is great, but I have to ease myself into it.

Today started with my favourite walk, from the shack to Brices Wharf via the Scenic Drive, about 3 kilometres one way, Paul left early to fish at the warf and I arrived intime for a lift home for breakfast.                                                               The light rain overnight left the bush smelling fragrant, its a shame that we aren’t able to record smells to share online. After breakfast we drove to Horse Island on the Tuross River for an a paddle.

I love to follow this little creek into the hidden inner lake, it’s s so narrow and shallow, its great that power boats aren’t able to navigate their way in.

I had been intrigued by this sign on previous paddles, wondering about who had naked it in the treee and what it once said.  I had assumed that the message had long gone. It was only when I enlarged the photo I realised that it was an epitaph to a cherished mate. There is definitely a story waiting to be told.

The birding on this section of the Tuross is alway good I managed to tick 24 species.

Welcome Swallow chicks

Birding Goorooyaroo Nature Reserve

The weather in Canberra this morning was a cool 6 degrees and the North Westerly was still blowing. This didn’t deter the birds or the bird nerds, our group of 11 birders covered about 8 klms and spotted 45 species. This Shining Bronze Cuckoo was a first in the ACT for me as were 4 Western Gerygones. Can you spot the Tawny Frogmouth chick snuggled up close to mum below?